Category Archives: World cuisines

How to make homemade (baked) falafel

Falafels are a handy “store cupboard” meal for an easy weekday lunch or dinner. You can make a large batch and demolish them whenever takes your fancy – which, for me, would be for every meal.

Falafel Salad

The falafel patties will keep for several days in the fridge. Having said that, they do start to crumble and dry out the longer you leave them. If this happens just drizzle some extra oil over the patties before baking.

The recipe below is for a colourful salad – but you can easily turn the patties into mini burgers and stuff them into pitta bread with sliced tomato, rocket and fried red onion. Just a suggestion.

Serves 4

Ingredients

For the falafelHomemade Falafel

  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 1 garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 x 400g can chickpeas
  • 1 x 400g can mixed beans (kidney, borlotti and black eyed beans)
  • 2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp mixed herbs
  • 1 lemon, zest grated
  • 2 tbsp chopped coriander (herb)
  • Salt and pepper,
  • 1 tbsp chickpea flour OR 1 egg (for binding the ingredients together)

For the salad

  • 2 tbsp red cabbage mayonnaise
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced
  • 2 x red and yellow pepper, sliced
  • a handful of rocket
  • 1 tomato, sliced thinkly
  • 1/2 small cucumber, chopped
  • 1 tspb jalepeno peppers

Directions

  • Heat a tablespoon of oil in a small pan. Fry the onion over a medium heat for 3-4 minutes until softened. Add the garlic and fry for a further two minutes and remove from the heat.
  • Drain and rinse the chickpeas and mixed beans and transfer to a mixing bowl. Add the sautéed onion and garlic and crush together with a potato masher until the mixture is broken down.
  • Add the cumin, mixed herbs and lemon zest and mix well. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Add the flour / egg and mix together.
  • Preheat the oven to 200C. Divide the mixture into 16 walnut-sized balls and place on a non-stick baking tray.
  • Rest in the fridge for 20-30 minutes.
  • Remove the falafel from the fridge, drizzle with the remaining oil and bake for 25 minutes, or until crisp and golden-brown. Turn occasionally to ensure even cooking.
  • For the salad, arrange the ingredients on a plate with sliced (cooked) falafel placed on top.

Warm new potato and mackerel salad recipe

I’ve featured mackerel a few times on this blog – only because I love it and because it’s such a nutritious source of food; packed with protein, vitamin D, selenium, niacin (vitamin B3) and vitamin B12.

This recipe provides good all-round combination of energy, texture and flavour. I love the warm and waxy new potatoes, the crunch of the gem lettuce, the slight acidity of the red onions and the saltiness of the smoked mackerel.

Bon Appetite!

Grilled mackerel, red onion and potato salad

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 200g new potatoes
  • 2 smoked mackerel fillets (about 200g weight; skinned and flaked)
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 baby gem lettuce, chopped
  • a small handful of dill or chives, chopped

Directions

  • Cook the potatoes in a large pan of boiling salted water for 15-20 minutes or until tender.
  • While the potatoes are cooking, mix the red onion with the lemon and add small a pinch of salt. This helps to tenderise the red onion.
  • Drain the potatoes, halve and set aside to cool down for a few minutes.
  • Add the smoked mackerel and gem lettuce to a serving bowl and toss gently together. Then add the new potatoes with the olive oil, red onion (including the lemon juice) and dill. 
  • Toss together to mix thoroughly.
  • Pile on two plates and serve warm.

Sri Lanka

Eggs, Dhal curry, string hoppers, pol sambal

Eggs, Dhal curry, string hoppers, pol sambal

“What’s the difference between Sri Lankan food and Indian food?”

This was possibly the most prevalent question from friends and family on return from my honeymoon in Sri Lanka last month.

It’s quite simple really: the fundamentals of Sri Lankan ingredients are rice, coconut and native tropical fruits and vegetables.

(If you ask a local, however, they will invariably state rather playfully that Sri Lankans subsist simply on “Rice and curry”).

The food itself is therefore not as eclectic as the typical Indian dish might be – no sign of any saag paneer, rogan josh or vindaloo but there were certainly many stunningly flavours, interesting textures and very heavy spices (most Sri Lankan food is unapologetically hot).

The information and images in this post provide a culinary snapshot of how myself and my loving new wife experienced this fascinating country.

The Curries, rice and other carbohydrates

(from left) bananas, pol sambal, dhal curry, coconut roti, rice hoppers, vegetable omelette

(from left) bananas, pol sambal, dhal curry, coconut roti, rice hoppers, vegetable omelette

The curries of Sri Lanka take the form of chicken, beef, fish or vegetable all served with boiled rice.

Rice flour in Sri Lanka is also shaped into rice flour pancakes (called ‘hoppers’) or rice noodles (‘string hoppers’).

Hoppers are a breakfast staple. These round bowl-shaped pancakes, cooked in a rounded pan (like a miniature wok), are best with an egg fried into the bottom. Made from fermented rice flour, they are used to pick up many of the same curries and accoutrements that rice would, especially the sweetened seeni sambals (sweet caramelised onion).

Bread was commonly served at breakfast. There’s a uniquely Sri Lankan version of roti, made with coconut flour, which forms a thick disk and can be found at breakfast and throughout the day.

Sides, snacks and ‘short eats’

(top left) dhal curry, (top right) grated coconut and carrots, (bottom right) curried aubergine, (bottom left) mallum

(top left) dhal curry, (top right) grated coconut and carrots, (bottom right) curried aubergine, (bottom left) mallum

Sri Lankan food is served with all sorts of condiments. Pol sambal (spicy, scraped coconut); mallum (a dish of shredded leaves: kale, mustard greens, cabbage with scraped coconut, lime juice, onion, chili, and Maldive fish) and lentil curry (‘Dhal’) were prevalent among these.

Some of our meals were served with ‘Gotu kola’ (pictured right), a small herb which has been used to treat many conditions for thousands of years in India, China, and Indonesia. It was used to heal wounds, improve mental clarity, and treat skin conditions such as leprosy and psoriasis.The herb itself had a strong taste, not unlike watercress – probably with similar quantities of iron, too.

Sri Lankan snacks are usually called “short eats” which consist mainly of samosas and vadai (deep fried chickpea patties) sold in newspaper cones on many of our public train journeys.

Hot, hot, hot!

As previously mentioned Sri Lankan food is known to be very spicy. If you are a foreigner it’s probably worth inquiring as to the level of heat in a dish before you order. Common spices used in Sri Lankan cooking are cumin, coriander, fenugreek, ginger, garlic, turmeric and cinnamon.

Interestingly, black pepper used to be the most powerful spice on the island until peppers arrived on a colonial trade ship.

Where to find Sri Lankan food

Now that I’ve gotten you all excited about Sri Lankan food, here’s the bad news: it isn’t that easy to find elsewhere!

After arriving back in the UK I searched the local libraries for cookery books on Sri Lanka with no joy. Restaurants are not exactly a dime a dozen either – certainly none that I know of in Edinburgh.

Even in Sri Lanka, the best way to eat good, authentic meals is to knock on the door of “rests” (the local version of a guesthouse) and ask them to cook you dinner later that night. Tourist hotels and guesthouses catering to Westerners tend to do watered-down versions of local food or pretty terrible attempts at Western food.

Wherever you find it, the key to enjoying Sri Lankan food is simple: don’t be afraid of strong flavours.

Scrumptious summer salad recipes

I’ve included these recipes as a tribute to the bright and joyous colours of summer (UK not included). They’re rather eclectic but the flavours are definitely there. Hope you enjoy them.

Mackerel, mozarella and red pepper salad with mustard root mash aerial Soba noodle stir fry with broccoli, spring onions, tofu and leafy greens 2 Carrot, red cabbage and broad bean slaw Mackerel, mozarella and red pepper salad with mustard root mash 2

Smoked mackerel, mozzarella and red pepper salad with wholegrain mustard root mash

They say never to pair fish with cheese but I think this recipe works wonders. The strong flavour of the mackerel is well matched with the creaminess and texture of the mozzarella. Finally, the oiled peppers and mustard mash give it some additional punch alongside the crunchy gem lettuce.

Mackerel, mozarella and red pepper salad with mustard root mash 2

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 100g smoke mackerel, cooked
  • 100g reduced fat mozzarella cheese, torn into small chunks
  • 1 red pepper, 1 yellow pepper, in oil/char grilled (pre-packaged)
  • 1 baby gem lettuce
  • A handful of lambs lettuce

For the root vegetable – mustard mash

  • 500g mixed root vegetables: I used 1 small swede, 1 small celeriac and 2 carrots
  • 25g butter
  • 1 tbsp wholegrain mustard

Directions

  • For the root vegetable mash, put the vegetables in a large pan of salted water. Bring to the boil and cook for 15 minutes until tender. Drain well, then mash adding the butter and mustard.
  • Mix together until the butter has melted.
  • Add some salt and pepper then serve.
  • For the salad, arrange the mackerel, mozzarella, salad leaves and mixed peppers in a bowl and pour over the oil from the mixed peppers.
  • Mix together thoroughly before serving alongside the mash

Soba noodle stir fry with broccoli, spring onions, tofu and leafy greens

This vegetarian recipe has great East Asian flavours and is seriously flavourful. The soba noodles offer a decent alternative to wheat pasta, if you are gluten-intolerant, and the dish itself offers a healthy balance of protein, carbs and very little fat.

Soba noodle stir fry with broccoli, spring onions, tofu and leafy greens 2

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 5 tbsp olive oil
  • 100g soba noodles
  • 3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • A small cube of fresh ginger, finely sliced
  • 1 head of broccoli, cut into florets
  • 150g firm tofu, drained, patted dry and cut into small cubes
  • 4 Spring onions, sliced lengthways
  • 4 tbsp soy sauce
  • 2 tbsp honey
  • (optional) a handful of leafy greens
  • (optional) 2 tbsp almond nut butter
  • Salt and pepper

Directions

  • In a large pot of boiling water, cook the soba noodles according to package instructions. Add the broccoli florets for the final 5 minutes of cooking. Cook until tender.
  • Drain the water then toss the noodles and broccoli with 2 tbsp of olive oil to prevent the noodles from sticking together.
  • Next, in a small bowl, whisk together the soy sauce and honey; set aside.
  • Heat 3 tbsp olive oil in a large wok or frying pan over high heat. Add the tofu and cook until golden brown, stirring constantly, for about 3-4 minutes. Set the tofu aside in a small dish.
  • Heat the remaining 2 tbsp olive oil over a medium heat, adding the garlic, ginger and spring onions. Cook, stirring frequently, for about 1 minute.
  • Add the soy sauce and honey to the pan and toss in the soba noodles, broccoli florets and tofu.
  • (optional) Finally, stir the almond-nut butter into the pan until well mixed.
  • Season to taste and then serve alongside the (optional) leafy greens.

Carrot, red cabbage and broad bean slaw

This is a colourful and crunchy recipe which can be eaten as a main or side dish.

Carrot, red cabbage and broad bean slaw

Serves 2

Ingredients

  • 1 small red cabbage, quartered, cored and shredded finely
  • 6 carrots, cut into thin strips (a decent food processor should have an attachment blade for this)

For the dressing:

  • 1 tbsp sesame oil,
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice,
  • Salt and pepper,
  • 150g broad beans,
  • (optional) a handful of coriander,
  • (optional) a sprinkle of sesame seeds, or some other variety of Omega 3/Omega 6 rich seeds (linseeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds)

Directions

  • Mix the sesame oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper in a small bowl to make a dressing and then set aside.
  • Boil a large saucepan of water, add the cabbage and simmer for 3 minutes. Add the broad beans and simmer for 1 minute more. Drain the vegetables, leave to cool, then toss with the grated carrot, dressing and (optional) coriander leaves and sesame seeds.

How to make… Tarka Dal

Over the last few weeks I’ve had an incredible craving for lentils. Creamy red, yellow or green lentil recipes always remind me of the hearty broths I used to have growing up: mixtures with the consistency of porridge – largely due to the amount of pearl barley and vegetables – and a great all round flavour.

image

Combining this craving with my love of India (and Indian food) can result in only one outcome: creating the perfect Tarka Dal recipe.

How to make Tarka dal

Ingredients (from left) – ginger, garlic, coriander leaves; (tea spoons) – chili flakes, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, turmeric and yellow split peas.

The recipe below is simple and can be done in two stages: the lentils are cooked in turmeric-infused water and left to rest while preparing the seasoned spice mixture or “tarka” as it is known in Indian and Pakistani cuisine.

Ingredients

  • 250g yellow dried split peas
  • 2 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp cumin seeds
  • 1 tsp coriander seeds
  • 1 tsp chilli flakes
  • 2cm/¾in piece fresh ginger, peeled and cut into thin strips
  • 3 garlic cloves, peeled and left whole
  • ¾ tsp ground turmeric
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • chopped fresh coriander leaves
  • 1 Scottish oatcake (optional)

Directions

  • Bring the lentils to the boil in a pan with enough cold water to cover them two inches over the top. Stir in the turmeric and leave to simmer for 40 minutes (whilst skimming off the scum that rises to the surface every so often) until the water has been absorbed.
  • In a small frying pan, dry-fry the cumin and coriander seeds over a medium heat.
  • Remove the seeds from the pan and grind into a powder.
  • Heat the vegetable oil in the same frying pan over a medium heat and gently fry the chopped garlic, with the chili flakes and the ginger.
  • Fry for 1 minute.
  • Once the garlic is golden, mix in the ground cumin and coriander. Add some water as necessary to loosen the mixture.
  • Give the lentils a stir.
  • Add more water as necessary before finally mixing in your aromatic fried ‘Tarka’ mixture.
  • Season to taste, then serve topped with coriander and an oatcake on the side.